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Metro Business Report October 28, 2011

By Lane Beattie | Posted - Oct. 28, 2011 at 10:57 a.m.



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This is Lane Beattie of the Salt Lake Chamber with your Metro Business Report.

Mercury pollution is a big problem, and it's only getting bigger. It is most pronounced in developing countries like China and India, where coal-burning still remains a major resource of power generation. Worldwide, about one thousand tons of mercury is produced per year. The resulting pollution makes water and soil unusable, and poses substantial health risks to people nearby.

University of Utah researcher Ling Zang hopes to address this growing problem in China and beyond with a new test for detecting mercury. The test promises to be faster and cheaper than conventional tests, which require samples to be sent to a laboratory. That can take weeks to process and can cost hundreds of dollars.

Zang's research is part of the Utah Science Technology and Research initiative—better known as USTAR. USTAR is a long-term, state-funded investment to strengthen Utah's "knowledge economy." This revolutionary initiative invests in world-class innovation teams and research facilities at the University of Utah and Utah State University, to create novel technologies that are subsequently commercialized through new business ventures.

This is Lane Beattie for KSL News Radio.

Lane Beattie

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