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3rd earthquake shakes Utah County residents



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SARATOGA SPRINGS -- Three earthquakes less than three day shave residents in Utah County on edge. Two of the quakes happened Sunday within hours of each other.


It sounded like a Mac truck was just like making its way around the neighborhood, crashing into houses. It was really loud.

–Dave Roach, Saratoga Springs resident


The most recent happened just at 6:09 p.m. According to the University of Utah Seismograph Stations, the 2.8 magnitude tremor hit roughly 3 miles west of Lehi.

Prior to Sunday night's trembler, that Seismograph Stations' data shows an earthquake early Sunday at 2:25 a.m. that measured a 2.8 magnitude. The first quake happened four miles west of Lehi at 7:38 p.m. Friday, registering 2.5 in magnitude.

While they disturbed hundreds of people, seismologists say frequent earthquakes like these are pretty normal.

"It sounded like a Mac truck was just like making its way around the neighborhood, crashing into houses. It was really loud," said Saratoga Springs resident Dave Roach.

Roach downloaded an app on his phone and discovered the epicenter of the second quake wasn't too far from home.

"Turned out it was a 2.8 and it was in a field maybe 200 yards [away]," he said.


A large, damaging earthquake could happen at any time, and they (Utahns) should be prepared for it.

–Jim Pechmann, U. seismologist


The Bohn family also lives close to the reported epicenter. Friday night, Jamie Bohn felt her house shake and thought it was her boys acting a little too rambunctious.

"I basically just kind of felt like all of our boys were on our wood floor jumping up and down, just kind of that shaking motion," Jamie said.

"It was kinda scary 'cause it was like my first one, but after a while I kinda said it was cool," Jamie's son said.

Seismologists say earthquakes tend to occur in clusters and it's not uncommon in Utah. Many quakes aren't even felt by people because they happen in such remote areas.

A Jan. 3 earthquake of 4.5 magnitude happened in the Tushar Mountains and was felt by Beaver City residents and other small communities in the area. That quake was followed by another on Jan. 12, six miles northwest of Circleville. Measured at 3.5 magnitude, geologists say it was part of the same seismic sequence.

"Utah is earthquake country," said Jim Pechmann, a University of Utah seismologist. "A large, damaging earthquake could happen at any time, and they (Utahns) should be prepared for it. There's no reason to panic right now."

As far as we know, no one has reported any serious damage, just a few tilted pictures.

If anything, the people KSL spoke to say they've checked their emergency supplies and realized they could be better prepared.

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Story written by Anne Forester, with contributions from Amy Joi O'Donoghue.

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