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Floodplain Maps Changing in Farmington

Floodplain Maps Changing in Farmington



Estimated read time: 2-3 minutes

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Alex Cabrero ReportingEven with all the rain we've had recently, there are still no worries about any flooding. As dry as it's been, flooding is the last thing on anybody's minds, unless you're in the floodplain in Farmington.

Farmington is one of those places where the creeks seem to rise too fast when it rains. Sandbagging in the spring there is about as common as planting flowers, and while that probably won't change, the old floodplain map will.

There aren't too many places as peaceful as Danielle Nelson's backyard, but it sure took some hard work. She says, "It took us seven years before we were able to start building a house." Danielle Nelson and her husband had to build up their land four feet before putting in a home, mainly because it's so close to a creek, and well, this is Farmington.

Whenever it rains hard, you can find plenty of sandbags on creek banks throughout the city. It happens just about every year, which is why the Nelsons built up their land before building a house. You see, they live in a floodplain as do plenty of people throughout Farmington.

Now, though, some might be out of the floodplain even though they didn't move an inch.

Farmington Director of Community Development, David Petersen, says, "It's a good thing. They don't update these flood plain maps too often.

After a year and a half of hard work, the city and the federal emergency management agency, FEMA, have come up with new flood plain maps, taking into account better drainage technology and new housing development.

"This information compared to the early 90's and the early 80's, when the previous two updates occurred, is much better," Petersen said.

Some homeowners will soon find out if they're now out of the floodplain, and if so, will get to pay less in insurance.

Nelson told KSL, ‘Well, that's great. I just hope I'm out of the floodplain now. That'd be great."

The city can now receive federal funding if a disaster happens there -- earthquake, fire, or flood. If they didn't make these new maps, and something happened, they wouldn't have been able to get any federal disaster money.

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