Radio  /  Podcasts  / 

A Woman's View with Amanda Dickson

Amanda Dickson on the weekends? Oh yeah. News, politics, education, health, and family are all fair game for Amanda's panel of fascinating Utah women. Whether they're talking about their kids or discussing the big business headlines, these ladies have a unique voice all their own. Join the conversation.

Sunday, May 21, 2017

  • A Reason to Hope
    Amanda Dickson talks with Laura Wall, development director of the Alzheimer's Association Utah Chapter, Shauna Cheshire, labor and delivery nurse and owner of Mia Mama Fitness and Michelle Arnold, physics professor at Weber State about a reason to hope for a cure for Alzheimer's. The belief is that the first person to survive this disease has been born. Alzheimer's is the 6th deadliest killer right now, but there is a reason to hope. Also, the eclipse, the last one in our lifetime, is August 24th.
  • Advice for the Class of 2017
    How do you address the many Americans who feel, "Just leave President Trump alone and let him do his job?" Amanda Dickson talks with Laura Wall, development director of the Alzheimer's Association Utah Chapter, Shauna Cheshire, labor and delivery nurse and owner of Mia Mama Fitness and Michelle Arnold, physics professor at Weber State. They also discuss the president's first foreign trip to Saudi Arabia, Israel and the Vatican, and the much anticipated speech he is giving in Saudi Arabia about Islam. The segment ends with advice for the Class of 2017!
  • Is Trump running the US like a reality show?
    President Trump had the right to share classified information, but does he have the right to do it by accident? He has the right to choose to do so, but does he have the right to stumble on it? Amanda Dickson talks with Michelle Arnold, physics professor at Weber State, Laura Wall with Alzheimer's Association Utah Chapter and Shauna Cheshire, owner of Mia Mama Fitness about the president's sharing of information with the Russians in the Oval Office. Think about the reality shows on TV - the meaner the people are, the higher the ratings go. Is it possible the President is focused more on ratings than the welfare of the people?
  • Alzheimer's and the News
    "If you're caring for someone with Alzheimer's, don't let them watch the news." I had not thought of that until Laura Wall explained to me how frightening the news can be to someone with dementia. Amanda Dickson also talks with Laura Wall, development director with Alzheimer's Association Utah Chapter, Shauna Cheshire, owner of Mia Mama Fitness and Michelle Arnold, physics professor at Weber State University, about exposing the news to your children. They talk about the Justice Department decision to appoint former FBI Director Robert Mueller as special counsel to lead the federal investigation to allegations that the Trump campaign collaborated with Russia and about media coverage of the issue.

Sunday, May 14, 2017

  • Do colleges care?
    A new poll from New America, a D.C. based think tank, found that 64% of millennials believe that universities put the interest of the school above the interest of the student. What does that tell us? Is it true? Amanda Dickson sits down with West Jordan Superintendent Patrice Johnson and former Utah State University professor and state Representative Ronda Menlove. They discuss the changing nature of higher education, how most students have a combination of a broadcast class, an online class, and a traditional class.
  • "The whole truth never gets told."
    Amanda Dickson talks with the Superintendent of the Jordan District, Patrice Johnson, and former Utah State Representative Ronda Menlove about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints' decision to pull young men ages 14-18 from the Boy Scouts. They go on to talk about parenting and keeping your children from being overwhelmed. From those topics, they jump to the president's decision to fire former FBI Director James Comey. The Superintendent says, "From where I sit, I often see that the whole truth never gets told." From that topic, to Secretary Ryan Zinke's visit and whether that will have any effect on the decision regarding our national monuments.
  • Betsy DeVos in Utah
    Former Utah State Representative and educator Ronda Menlove talks about the Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' stop in Utah and what she had to say about education and choice. West Jordan Superintendent Patrice Johnson talked about how every parent in the Jordan District does have choice within the public school system. As students mature, there is even more choice. The Superintendent explained about the new charter school with Real Salt Lake that will focus on students who are interested in soccer and STEM. The Jordan School District helps with the curriculum, but the school is supported by private money. The former Representative also explains how the new health care bill from the House cuts Medicaid funding for schools that supports special needs children.
  • What to ask a teacher
    If you want to support a teacher, ask him or her - "How can I support you?" The answer will be different from one teacher to the next. "Next to parents, teaching is the most noble profession on the earth." Jordan School District Superintendent Patrice Johnson shares that and other thoughts as we wind up Teacher Appreciation Week. Amanda Dickson talks with the superintendent and former Utah State Representative and educator Ronda Menlove about teacher appreciation and how to keep teachers in the classroom. It's a challenge nationwide and in Utah.

Sunday, May 7, 2017

  • No More Pencils, No More Books
    The end of the school year is approaching, and that means students are busy taking end-of-year assessments, the PTSAs are recruiting next year's parent-teacher association leaders, and we're looking at what we can do to keep teachers happy and attract tomorrow's educators to the field of education.  Christine Cooke, a policy analyst with the Sutherland Institute's Center for Educational Progress, details how parents can help set the stage for success for their own children and their local schools, as well as what different districts and charter schools are doing to attract and retain the best-qualified teachers.  Dr. Laurie Sullivan-Sakaeda, a therapist who works with veterans with PTSD, and Sharon Goodrich, a community volunteer and the retired Foundation Director at Primary Children's
  • National Mental Health Awareness Month
    President Donald Trump declared May to be National Mental Health Awareness Month, and Amanda Dickson's guests agree we need to do more to erase the stigma associated with mental illness. Dr. Laurie Sullivan-Sakaeda, a therapist with Headin' Home Foundation and A Helping Hoof, talks about the work she does with veterans with PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder. The vets from all eras work to help "gentle" mustangs, and the mustangs provide a "mirror" for the vets and often help identify what's going on before either the veteran or Dr. Laurie knows. The good news: veteran suicide rates are declining, but they are still far too high.  KSL Digital Content Producer Becky Bruce fills in for a vacationing Amanda, with additional guests Christine Cooke, a policy analyst with the Sutherland Insti
  • A Heart for Kids: the Jimmy Kimmel Dilemma
    Comedian and talk show host Jimmy Kimmel made an emotional plea when he returned to work after an unexpected week off. He explained that his newborn son was born with heart disease and needed immediate open-heart surgery and critical care to survive. His question to the audience: can we all agree that no parent should ever have to decide whether they can afford to save their child's life? We may never agree as a country on health care reform, but guest host Becky Bruce asks Amanda Dickson's guests whether we can find some kind of common ground.  Guests include Dr. Laurie Sullivan-Sakaeda, a therapist with Headin' Home Foundation and a Helping Hoof; Sharon Goodrich, a community volunteer and retired Foundation Director at Primary Children's Hospital; and Christine Cooke, a policy analyst w
  • Can't We All Just Get Along?
    Amanda Dickson is on vacation, so KSL Newsradio Digital Content Producer Becky Bruce fills in with guests Sharon Goodrich, community volunteer and retired Foundation Director at Primary Children's Hospital, Christine Cooke, a policy analyst with the Sutherland Institute's Center for Educational Progress, and Dr. Laurie Sullivan-Sakaeda, a therapist specializing in working with veterans who have PTSD.  Congress has managed to approve a stopgap funding measure that avoids a government shutdown for at least another year, but is there a way for legislators to ever put their own politics aside and pass more than just a stopgap bill? What would it take to get Washington to get along and play nice? 

Sunday, April 30, 2017

  • Whoa - the first 100 days
    Whether you agree with what President Trump has done during his first 100 days or not, most people would agree - he's been busy! Amanda Dickson sits down with Kathy Nelson with Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services, Andrea Jensen, Environmental Health Educator with the Utah County Health Department and Crystal Young-Otterstrom, Executive Director of Utah Cultural Alliance to talk about that and President Trump's tax plan, what's being call the biggest tax cut in history. Crystal, who runs a non-profit, shares the concerns non-profits have about the tax plan.
  • Huntsman and Bears Ears
    What happened at the University of Utah when the CEO of the Huntsman Center was fired by email? No one's best practices would advocate firing someone, let alone a CEO, in this way. Kathy Nelson with Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services, Andrea Jensen, Environmental Health Educator with the Utah County Health Department and Crystal Young-Otterstrom, Executive Director of Utah Cultural Alliance, talk about this decision, and the reinstating of Dr. Mary Beckerlee, then move on to the topic of looking at the national monuments under President Trump's executive order.
  • You can still ATV Bears Ears!
    One of Amanda Dickson's guests explains on the Bears Ears topic that changing the land from BLM land to national monument land does not change the way the land can be used, does not change the income that can be earned in that area. So what is everyone complaining about? Kathy Nelson with Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services, Andrea Jensen, Environmental Health Educator with the Utah County Health Department and Crystal Young-Otterstrom, Executive Director of Utah Cultural Alliance talk Bears Ears and then they move into the topic of May being Older Americans Month. Kathy encourages older Americans to #AgeOutLoud - be proud of aging and the wisdom and mistakes and experience that comes with it.