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Wind and Storms

Posted Sep 12th - 1:16pm

When a storm is approaching from the North or Northwest, why do we have strong winds from the South? It looks like it would blow the storm away!

David L.

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Steamy Showers

Posted Sep 8th - 5:21pm

There is nothing I love more that getting in the shower in the morning, turning on the hot water and watching the shower billow with steam. However, in our dry climate I get mixed results. Sometimes it billows, most of the time it doesn't. I've attempted to analyze the conditions present when it did billow and try to recreate them the next time. But the outcomes are always different.

For example, if I take a shower 30-60 minutes after my wife, I notice the shower is still humid but has cooled down. This generally results in billowing steam but not always. Sometimes on a cold morning I get billowing steam, but other times I don't.

So my question is this, what are the atmospheric variables I should be aware of in my shower and what are the ideal conditions I can try to create in order to enjoy billowing steam every morning?


Weather Projects

Posted Sep 8th - 3:02pm

Hello, My name is Lissa Davies my son Dallas goes to West Point Jr. High and he has a science project that we need some help with. The project is how to make rain or snow in a bottle. He remembers doing something like this in school 3 years ago when we lived in Las Vegas. The first part of the assignment which is the instructions on the experiment is due on Tuesday Sept.12, 2006. Could you please point us in the right direction where to find out this information we would really appreciate it. Thank again for your attention and help with this, Lissa and Dallas D.

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Oh yes, the cloud in the bottle or if you get enough condensation you can make rain. There's a couple of ways to do this. You'll need a jar and some hot water and some ice cubes and a plate, it's not too hard.


Moon Phases

Posted Sep 8th - 2:11pm

Good day. I live in Wendover, Utah and on September 13, 2006 at 12:30am for four hours at least, the local electric company has a scheduled power outage for the whole town to effect improvements. No this renders the whole town, both Nevada and the Utah side of Wendover completely black except for the inside of the casinos (which will be running limitedly on generators). Now my question is, if this can be answered … where will the moon be that night. Will it be in our sky or on the other side of the world for that night? If the moon is on our side of the sky great, we will have some light to see by. However if it is on the other side of the world, you cannot see your hand in front of your face. That's no joke.

Thanks for your time,

AJ K


More Weather History

Posted Sep 8th - 2:07pm

Hello,

I am trying to find highs and lows for Sept. 1-5, do you know a website I can go to to obtain this information?

Thanks,


The Moon and a Satellite

Posted Sep 1st - 4:03pm

On Saturday night some history will be made on the moon again. The European Space Agency will take SMART-1 a satellite that's been up in space since 2003 and crash it into the suface of the moon. This will happen at around 11:40 mountain time Saturday night and should be at angle so which the craft is illuminated. SMART-1 has been running on solar panel on its mission in space so far.

SMART-1 will land at the "Lake of Excellence" a real place on the moon, it's a 100 mile wide crater on the southern hemisphere of the moon. If you have a telescope you should be able to see this impact, something like a meteor crashing into the moon.

The Salt Lake Astronomical Society will have a public party on Saturday night to check out Pluto and SMART-1. The information is on the right and you can find the directions to their gathering over on their website.


Forecaster Terms

Posted Sep 1st - 12:57pm

Recently, while camping and trying to dry off from a prettygood thunderbumper, we had a debate about X% of rain in the forecast. For instance, we often hear the weatherman say there is a 40% chance of rain, or inthe case of the day we were camping, a 30% chance. Where I was sitting, it turned into a 100% chance… but I digress. The question that came upduring the debate was how do you determine what % chance. My brother said that they take an average of say the last 10 years and on that particular date (let's say July 29) and you say okay it rained 4 out of the last 10 years on July 29 so there is a 40% chance of rain. I say that might have been how it was done 100 years ago, but with the technology and being able to track weather patterns and storms that it is more accurate and less voodoo and almanac. Or maybe it is a combination of the two. Can you help clarify?

Rick P.

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Hurricane John

Posted Sep 1st - 10:20am

How is it that the storm battering the Pacific Coast of Mexico is a Hurricane (John) and not a Typhoon? Is the name John in sequence with Ernesto as well (meaning where is F, G, H, and I?) Just curious. Thanks!

Mike D.

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Cross Section of Fronts

Posted Aug 30th - 3:43pm

KSL Weather Team,

I am assisting our scoutmaster with the weather merit badge. Two requirements are giving me some difficulty. They are as follows:

Requirement 3) Draw cross sections of a cold front and a warm front showing the location and movements of the cold and warm air, the frontal slope, the location and types of clouds associated with the front, and the location of rain. Tell the differences between a cold front and a warm front.


Thunderstorms

Posted Aug 30th - 1:54pm

How can you tell when a real good thunderstorm is on its way?

G.B.

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